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A Bolete associated with oak trees - Case 2

  • This is a fresh post for a Bolete found under Quercus ilex, fruiting early in October, in calcareous substrate present in the M altese Islands, maybe someone is familiar with them.


    This collection forms flattened or shallowly convex caps sometimes upturning (involute) to a large extent initially starting as dark sepia or cinnamon brown with red hues, cracking at an early age as a net and deepening while maturing with the exposed flesh in these cracks becoming amazingly deep red. It has the X. chrysenteron effect! Margin beige to light brown


    The stipe is chrome yellow with golden-sepia flushes, especially towards the base. Mature specimens (5 hrs after collection) develop a reddish collar under the stipe. W hen cut in half, there is no bluening both in the stipe or in the pileus, however a red layer is formed below the cuticle of the cap and at the borders of the uppermost part of the stipe. The context in collected specimens develops a sepia brown color at the lower half (but no color change in the fresh-cut specimens, (hence color is light yellow)


    Hymenium or stipe do not change color when bruised


    Hymenium pale yellow then darkens to olive-brown with age


    Pores angular, rectangular, pentagon or sometimes hexagon, 0.5 to 1.0 (1.3) mm across the widest diameter.


    Scent faint sweet, but unless something abnormal took place, it became strongly aromatic, like resin of pine trees when oldened by one day


    Spores elongated ellipsoid (truncate ends not detected) with amorphous non distinct oil bodies. Measurement: 10.2 [11.6 ; 12.2] 13.7 × 4.3 [5.1 ; 5.5] 6.3 µm [ Mean = 11.9 × 5.3 µm ]; Qe = 1.9 [2.2 ; 2.3] 2.6 [mean 2.3] Inamyloid.


  • Hello Steve,

    is it correct that there is no blueing in the flesh?

    However, if there was at least temporarily blueing I tend to call them Hortiboletus bubalinus.

    FG

    Oehrling

    PSVs dürfen weder über I-Net noch übers Telefon Pilze zum Essen freigeben - da musst du schon mit deinem Pilz zum lokalen PSV!

  • Hello Steve,

    is it correct that there is no blueing in the flesh?

    However, if there was at least temporarily blueing I tend to call them Hortiboletus bubalinus.

    FG

    Oehrling

    THANK You Oehrling


    In the flesh of the stipe, there was no blueing at all, but in some basidiocarps there was a hint (just a vague hint) on the pore surface and the stipe surface (making it look greenish!), And this before being touched. When the pores were gently scraped, they just become darker and wet.


    I went again on site yesterday! I found more specimens and I have some further notes


    - 4% NaOH on flesh makes it become slightly pink-pale red


    -The scent of fresh specimens is not very strong but had a bit of aromatic or ink-like scent mixed with mushroom-lke scen. When old and drying, the specimens attained a more aromatic scent


    -All specimens produce some pinkness (at various degrees) under the cap (a layer of 1mm) and sometimes below the cuticle of the upper region of the stipe


    - Never any redness was observed at the base of the stipe (I checked some 8 specimens now!). When camera flash was used, this may show brownish dots but to the eye they are not distinct.

  • Hello Steve,

    is it correct that there is no blueing in the flesh?

    However, if there was at least temporarily blueing I tend to call them Hortiboletus bubalinus.

    FG

    Oehrling

    I was too sleepy yesterday! So today I checked about Hortiboletus bubalinus and you are right in suggesting this species. From boletales.org; "Flesh whitish in the cap, distinctly pinkish below the cap cuticle, yellowish in the stipe, orange brown in the stipe base" - this is pinpoint true. It could be it. What I see different is the bulbous thick base and the cap do not crack readily as what I witnessed in this population. If different, it is very related species.

    Thanks for yr suggestion

  • Of course it is possible that this is a mediterranean species which is unknown in Central Europe and maybe undescribed.

    I suppose, the first thing to do is to find out whether this is a Xerocomus, a Xerocomellus or a Hortiboletus. Unfortunately I lack good up-to-date-literature, so I can't say what makes a Xerocomus, a Xerocomellus or a Hortiboletus.

    Let's call Beorn he ist more encountered with these blueing felty boletes.

    FG

    Oehrling

    PSVs dürfen weder über I-Net noch übers Telefon Pilze zum Essen freigeben - da musst du schon mit deinem Pilz zum lokalen PSV!

  • Good morning!


    Hm, well - I wouldn't call myself an expert on those Boletes. Especially because in mediterrenean areas are some species described, which are totally unknown to me.

    But Hortiboletus bubalinus might be an option, although some aspects are odd: normally young basidiocarps are blueing strongly (stipe and lower half of pileus-flesh), and older basidiocarps have a strongly fibrillose stem.
    Those were the main characters, why i was thinking more of Hortiboletus engelii.

    The Q-value of the spores is somewhat inconsistent, although it is often mentioned for differentiating those two: But my own measurements show a significant difference only in really mature basidiocarps, in younger stades the spores can look more or less the same.



    LG; Pablo.

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